Posts Tagged ‘golden age’

Tiger_Girl

Tiger Girl made her debut in 1944 in the Fiction House title: Fight Comics.  The original artist was Robert Webb, and other artists who rendered her over the years include Jack Kamen and Matt Baker.

Tiger Girl’s original name is Princess Vishnu, that, as well as the tiger theme and her companion, a tiger named Benzali, tie her to India — however, the jungle she lives in is usually African.  Tiger Girl has a “tiger ring”, which gives her added strength when she looks at it.

Tiger Girl was presented in Fight Comics until 1952 and then was transferred to Jungle Comics, mostly in reprints. Her last appearance was in 1954 in Jungle Comics #163.

In the late 1960s, Gold Key Comics released a title called Tiger Girl, but the only connection to the original Fiction House creation was the name.  Not protected by copyright, she has appeared in more recent times in titles produced by AC Comics.

Portrait

A portrait featuring a rather distinguished Monster of Frankenstein.  Digital pencils and inkwash.  Writer Martin Powell and I are bringing Dick Briefer’s THE MONSTER OF FRANKENSTEIN back to life in our new graphic novel, inspired by the classic non-code horror series of the 1950s.  Published by Sequential Pulp/Dark Horse Comics in 2012.

I’m often asked about my process in creating pictures, so I figured I would do a step-by-step on my latest illustration.

Step 1. I start all my work in Photoshop. I have pre-created page templates at various sizes to work on. The one pictured here is a virtual 10″x15″ at 400 dpi. I create my rough sketch segregating elements in different layers; this one has 7 layers; for the background and others for the various figures, which makes it easy to move items around to get the composition I want without having to redraw.

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Step 1: The rough layout.

Step 2. After completing my rough and finalizing the composition, and still working in Photoshop — I start doing a cleaner, tighter version, working on each picture element individually. In this stage I also add rudimentary light and shade. Each of the more detailed images are then saved separately in preparation for the next stage. This basically represents my finished pencils.

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Step 2: Defining the graphics.

Step 3. Once I have my digital version of “finished” pencils ready, I then import them as a blue-line into Manga Studio, where I create an “ink” layer and ink away. As you can see I add a lot of details in the ink stage that are not present in my penciled version. I do this for each picture element from the original layout, and I personally have a lot of fun at this stage, since I can start to see the characters take on life!

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Step 3: Inking…

Step 4. Once I’ve inked the various elements in Manga Studio, they are saved as Tiff files and then loaded back into Photoshop, where I composite each to their respective places in the layout. The inked figures are in separate layers so it’s still easy to make changes if necessary. I also work from the foreground to the background, and in this case all the foreground characters are inked and placed, and the next set will be the middle-ground figures and so on.

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Step 4: Compositing.

Step 5. After the figures and all foreground elements have been inked, the last item I work on is the background. I also do these in Manga Studio using the line and curve tools, or/and the pen tool for detailing. I create full backgrounds so I can add them to my library of personal clip-art for potential future use. Once the background is completed, I export the image as a Tiff file.

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Step 5: The Background inks.

Step 6: For the final step we’re back in Photoshop, where I load the inked background and composite it behind the inked figures for the final rendering. I then do any necessary clean-up and add any shadows (such as on the floor surface) and any other details that may be necessary to pull the piece together as a single unit.

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Step 6: Compositing.

And the final result is saved as a hi-res 300 dpi Tiff file, ready for colors or print.  Here is the finished illustration:

Frankenstein

The Monster of Frankenstein

This “Classic Superman” pic was my last traditional pencil, pen and ink drawing before I got my Wacom Cintiq tablet.  David Naughton-Shires was kind enough to provide a fantastic colored version as well.  Click pics to enlarge.

I was asked by Club Batman Spain to contribute to their upcoming Batman vs Joker Expo (Saturday, July 16 · 6:00pm – 9:00pm, in Spain) and that gave me the opportunity to re-create one of my favorite Golden Age covers from Detective Comics!  As you can see, I prefer a Robin-less Batman! 🙂

Detective Comics

My Cover Re-creation...

Detective

Original Cover with art by Jerry Robinson

A Collection of my Batman themed artwork

 

Classic Catwoman!

Posted: June 3, 2011 in Commissions
Tags: , ,

This piece was done as a commission for a fan who loved the Golden-Age version of Catwoman.  (Click on images to enlarge).