Posts Tagged ‘frankenstein’

SNEAK PEEK! Pages 1 and 2 from “Mary Shelley in Frankenstein’s Castle,” a story written by Nicola Cuti that I’m illustrating for The CREEPS # 12, coming later this year…

SPECIAL PREVIEW!  Here’s page 1 from “My Creation, My Beloved,” the story I’m illustrating in the graphic novel adaptation of Don Glut’s new movie TALES OF FRANKENSTEIN, which will be published by Pulp 2.0 Press. Also featuring art by Mike Vosburg, Brian Postman and Jim Craig, with an introduction by Jim Steranko!  Coming later this year!

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I’ve been doing a lot of work recently for THE CREEPS magazine, a horror anthology that’s a creepy throwback to the old Warren titles, Creepy and Eerie!  It’s been fun drawing these stories and working with such master writers such as Nicola Cuti and Don Glut, among others!  Here’s a couple of splash pages from my stories appearing in THE CREEPS # 11, available now at fine comic shops and Barnes & Noble book stores everywhere!  You can also order THE CREEPS direct from http://www.thecreepsmagazine.com/

Lost World 1

Since I’m working on a graphic novel based on Dick Briefer’s version of Frankenstein from the 1950s, I’ve been researching Briefer’s Frankenstein comics.   I came upon an entertaining tale called “World of Monsters” from Frankenstein #21, 1952.  In this story, Frankie stumbles across a “lost world” atop a plateau in “arid” Arizona, complete with dinosaurs and jungle girls, and that was the inspiration for the 2 pieces presented here. Click pics to enlarge!

Lost World 2

Portrait

A portrait featuring a rather distinguished Monster of Frankenstein.  Digital pencils and inkwash.  Writer Martin Powell and I are bringing Dick Briefer’s THE MONSTER OF FRANKENSTEIN back to life in our new graphic novel, inspired by the classic non-code horror series of the 1950s.  Published by Sequential Pulp/Dark Horse Comics in 2012.

I’m often asked about my process in creating pictures, so I figured I would do a step-by-step on my latest illustration.

Step 1. I start all my work in Photoshop. I have pre-created page templates at various sizes to work on. The one pictured here is a virtual 10″x15″ at 400 dpi. I create my rough sketch segregating elements in different layers; this one has 7 layers; for the background and others for the various figures, which makes it easy to move items around to get the composition I want without having to redraw.

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Step 1: The rough layout.

Step 2. After completing my rough and finalizing the composition, and still working in Photoshop — I start doing a cleaner, tighter version, working on each picture element individually. In this stage I also add rudimentary light and shade. Each of the more detailed images are then saved separately in preparation for the next stage. This basically represents my finished pencils.

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Step 2: Defining the graphics.

Step 3. Once I have my digital version of “finished” pencils ready, I then import them as a blue-line into Manga Studio, where I create an “ink” layer and ink away. As you can see I add a lot of details in the ink stage that are not present in my penciled version. I do this for each picture element from the original layout, and I personally have a lot of fun at this stage, since I can start to see the characters take on life!

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Step 3: Inking…

Step 4. Once I’ve inked the various elements in Manga Studio, they are saved as Tiff files and then loaded back into Photoshop, where I composite each to their respective places in the layout. The inked figures are in separate layers so it’s still easy to make changes if necessary. I also work from the foreground to the background, and in this case all the foreground characters are inked and placed, and the next set will be the middle-ground figures and so on.

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Step 4: Compositing.

Step 5. After the figures and all foreground elements have been inked, the last item I work on is the background. I also do these in Manga Studio using the line and curve tools, or/and the pen tool for detailing. I create full backgrounds so I can add them to my library of personal clip-art for potential future use. Once the background is completed, I export the image as a Tiff file.

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Step 5: The Background inks.

Step 6: For the final step we’re back in Photoshop, where I load the inked background and composite it behind the inked figures for the final rendering. I then do any necessary clean-up and add any shadows (such as on the floor surface) and any other details that may be necessary to pull the piece together as a single unit.

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Step 6: Compositing.

And the final result is saved as a hi-res 300 dpi Tiff file, ready for colors or print.  Here is the finished illustration:

Frankenstein

The Monster of Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Posted: June 3, 2011 in Commissions
Tags: , ,

Frankenstein commission piece.  The original black and white version, plus a variation with red background. (Click on pics to enlarge)